What can writers learn from art?

I’ve recently begun a course in ceramic at the Art House in Sheffield. It’s something I’ve wanted to do for a very long time and I’m really enjoying it. I loved art at school and it’s great to finally let that part of myself stretch its wings again. It’s had a knock on effect on my writing – a good one.

It has freed me up, made me take more risks. Before, I had become blinkered, entrenched in the form and expected manner of my writing. Novels are supposed to be written in a certain way, short stories usually take form x. y and z etc. However, by exposing myself to the risk of something new, to create in a looser way with clay, I have found that I’m more willing to take risks with my writing, to dig deeper and be a little looser.

This has led me to consider further, what can we as writers learn from art and artists. Yes, I know that the art world can be cut-throat, nepotistic and snobbish. But that’s just the same with the so-called upper echelons of the literature world. I believe that if we look more broadly at art, there’s a lot we can learn.

One of the main things we can emulate is the playfulness of some artists. Creativity is essentially play. This makes me think of a quote by Ray Bradbury, the Science Fiction writer and author of ‘Fahrenheit 451’

‘I don’t understand writers who have to work at it. I like to play. I’m interested in having fun with ideas, throwing them up in the air like confetti and then running under them.’

Writing should be playful. Yes, I know it sometimes feels like a hard slog and the words just don’t come and redrafting and editing can be a chore, but the actual act of creating a story or poem out of nowhere is magical and fun and playful. There really is nothing quite like it. Perhaps, if it’s not playful and enjoyable, then we aren’t truly speaking with our proper creative voice, we’re just putting words on a page that we think other people expect to see.

But just because art and writing should be, and can be playful, it doesn’t mean it isn’t important. I think Grayson Perry says it so so well in ‘Playing to the Gallery’:

‘Art is not some fun add-on to life. Go back to the Ice Age and the artists were still making art even when living constantly under threat..The need to express oneself runs very very deep. The problem is often accessing this need..without the self-consciousness that so curses teenagers and the world alike.’

Being playful, breaking free of the constraints of expectation of form, medium or technicality can set us free from that self-consciousness and lead us to be better writers.

 

 

 

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